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Nurture Heal Educate
19203 Aurora Ave. N.
Shoreline, Washington

Vaccination Guidelines

At Cats Exclusive we constantly review the latest medical literature to keep abreast of changes that we believe will enhance your cat’s health, including the safest-possible vaccination protocols. We strive to balance the needs for vaccinations to protect against deadly diseases, against the potential risks to cats from vaccines. Our goal is to keep your cat's vaccinations to the absolute lowest number necessary - recommending only those vaccinations that provide true protection. This means that the vaccine must be protective against the disease AND that there is otherwise a risk to cat of catching that disease.

We strive to provide your cat with protection from contagious diseases without causing harm. Therefore, we have compiled a brief description of each vaccine we offer, including their reported side effects. Any medication carries a small risk of allergic reaction. In addition, there are rare cats who are prone to tumors at injection sites. Our doctors will discuss individual vaccination schedules with you, taking into account the age of your cat(s), outdoor exposure and presence of other diseases.

FVRCPKitty vacinations Seattle

Known as the feline distemper/respiratory or “three-way” vaccine, this a core vaccine recommended for all cats. The vaccine provides protection against common strains of feline herpesvirus and calicivirus (common causes of “colds” and sometimes, serious respiratory disease) and panleukopenia virus (“distemper,” a potentially fatal gastroinstestinal disease).

FVRCP is designed to minimize or prevent upper respiratory tract infections. While no vaccine is 100% protective against contraction of a virus, the FVRCP vaccine provides excellent protection against the more severe symptoms of infection, thus enabling vaccinated cats to recover much faster.
All kittens and cats with unknown history should receive injectable FVRCP vaccines in a series of boosters every 3-4 weeks until they are 4 months plus a 1 year booster.

Cats that have completed the initial series would then receive an intranasal (drops in the nose) vaccine that is given every 3 years. It should be noted that up to 15% of cats may develop mild "cold" symptoms for 2-3 days after intranasal vaccination. We prefer the intranasal vaccine in older cats to reduce the risk of side effects that have been associated with the injectable vaccine: sarcomas, injection site pain, joint pain, and fever or vomiting.

Rabies

The second core vaccine that every cat should receive, protects against rabies. This vaccine is given to 4 month old kittens, then once a year thereafter. Because rabies is a deadly disease, communicable to humans, it is recommended in all cats, regardless of outside exposure. In Washington State, bats are the primary carrier for rabies virus. Roughly 8% of bats examined in the state of Washington between 1960 and 2000 were positive for the rabies virus. Rabies is not commonly found in cats, but it is deadly if contracted. The two most recent cases of human rabies infection in Washington State were in 1995 & 1997.

We use a non-adjuvanted vaccine, which has not been linked to vaccine-site sarcomas. However, as with all injectable vaccines, some side effects can occur, including: mild pain at the injection site, fever or lethargy, and vomiting or diarrhea.

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FeLV

This vaccine protects against the feline leukemia virus. We recommend this vaccine for cats who are allowed outside or whose housemates are allowed outside. Kittens and cats less than 7 years of age should receive an initial series of 2 vaccines, 3 weeks apart followed by a 1 year booster. The vaccine is then repeated every 3 years.

We use a non-adjuvanted vaccine, which has not been linked to vaccine-site sarcomas. However, as with all injectable vaccines, some side effects can occur, including: mild pain at the injection site, fever or lethargy, and vomiting or diarrhea.

We currently do not recommend other vaccines for your cat because we believe the risks outweigh the benefits. Our doctors would be happy to discuss this at examination.

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